ANZAC Day Books

The Gallipoli Letter

The Gallipoli Letter

The vivid, charged and emotional letter that changed the course of the Gallipoli campaign.
In September 1915, Keith Murdoch, then a young war journalist, wrote an 8000-word letter to the Prime Minister, Andrew Fisher. ‘The Gallipoli Letter’, as it came to be known, changed the course of the Gallipoli campaign. The letter, protesting against the conduct of the campaign and describing conditions at the front, is both intimate and conversational. It is also at times angry, passionate, vivid and very moving. At times, it is simply heartbreaking: “The heroic Fourth Brigade was reduced in three days’ fighting to little more than 1000 strong. You will be glad to know that the men died well.” The letter changed the course of the campaign: Hamilton, the general in charge of the campaign, was sent home, and the Allies were withdrawn in December of the same year. The Gallipoli Letter is an inspiring document. It speaks directly to us about war, our history and the indomitable Australian spirit. Accessible and compelling, it is a vital part of our history and the enduring Anzac legend.

Caesar: The True Story of a Canine ANZAC Hero

Caesar: The True Story of a Canine ANZAC Hero

A superb true story about the courage and loyalty of a dog and his handler in wartime. When the New Zealand Rifle Brigade marched down Queen Street to board their transport ship to the Western Front, they were led by their mascot, a bulldog named Caesar. One of those waving him farewell was four-year-old Ida, whose favourite ribbon had been tied to Caesar’s collar by his handler, her Uncle Tom.

Trained as a Red Cross dog, Caesar rescued wounded soldiers from the hell of no-man’s-land. Uncle Tom wrote home about their adventures to Ida, who eventually passed the stories on to her children and grandchildren. Patricia Stroud, Ida’s daughter, tells the poignant story of an unsung Kiwi hero, and a little-known aspect of the First World War. First published for younger readers, Caesar’s story has been expanded to include Gallipoli and the Western Desert. With personal anecdotes and accounts, Caesar’s story can now be seen in the wider context of New Zealand’s contribution to the First World War.

The Other Anzacs: Nurses at War 1914-1918

The Other Anzacs: Nurses at War 1914-1918

By the end of the Great War, 45 Australian and New Zealand nurses had died on overseas service and over 200 had been decorated. These were women who left for war on an adventure, but were soon confronted with remarkable challenges for which their civilian lives could never have prepared them. They were there for the horrors of Gallipoli and they were there for the savagery the Western Front. Within twelve hours of the slaughter at Anzac Cove they had over 500 horrifically injured patients to tend on one crammed hospital ship, and scores of deaths on each of the harrowing days that followed. Every night was a nightmare. Their strength and humanity were remarkable.

Using diaries and letters, Peter Rees takes us into the hospital camps, and the wards and the tent surgeries on the edge of some of the most horrific battlefronts of human history.

A Place to Remember: A History of the Shrine of Remembrance

A Place to Remember: A History of the Shrine of Remembrance

On the 11th of November 1934 over 300,000 people gathered on the slopes of Melbourne’s Domain to witness the dedication of the Shrine. It was the largest state war memorial Australia would build and it commemorated the sacrifice of no fewer than 114,000 Victorians who served in the Great War. A Place to Remember charts the Shrine’s history from the first fatalities of the Gallipoli landing to the present day.

With deft hand and luminous style, Bruce Scates masterfully situates the Shrine in its larger physical, cultural and historical landscape. Archival image and first person vignette mesh with vivid prose to reveal The Shrine then and now; its changing patterns of meaning through the many conflicts in which Australians have fought and died, and the enduring significance of this grand memorial in the heart of Melbourne, for generations to come. This special, limited edition is leather bound and comes in a slip-case.

A Stout Pair of Boots: Exploring Australia's Battlefields

A Stout Pair of Boots:

Exploring Australia’s Battlefields

Australians have begun to travel more and more to the places where their armed forces have fought overseas – the Western Front, the Burma-Thailand railway, and above all, Gallipoli. This book provides the background and essential information to enable battlefield visitors to make the most of these trips. It will help them understand what happened and why.

Untold Stories from War Correspondent Charles Bean and Front-line ANZACS

Gallipoli:

Untold Stories from War Correspondent Charles Bean and Front-line ANZACS

Commemorates the 90th anniversary of Gallipoli. Superb photographic book brings to life the untold stories of front-line Anzacs and the war Correspondent Charles Bean (Sydney Morning Herald) with photographs from Phillip Schuler (The Age). Although Australian originated, this book has significant NZ content. Gallipoli was a tragic campaign: 2000 Anzacs slaughtered in first 24 hours; 11,410 Anzacs in the nine months (of which 2700 were New Zealanders).

This unique book combines for the first time the official recordings of Bean and Schuler: many of the photos never published before. extracts from Bean’s private diaries in which he recorded the realities he was not allowed to print in his newspaper stories because of wartime censorship.

Another unique element are the personal stories of more than 100 Australians and NZers who served at Gallipoli. Following an appeal to readers, the Sydney Morning Herals, The Age and Dominion Post were inundated with memorabilia, diaries and photos from families to include in this book.

The Anzac Experience: New Zealand, Australia and Empire in the First World War

The Anzac Experience:

New Zealand, Australia and Empire in the First World War

The gripping story of Australians, New Zealanders and Canadians at war – from the Boer War in South Africa to the cataclysmic struggle of the First World War.

Soldier Boy: The True Story of Jim Martin, the Youngest Anzac

Soldier Boy: The True Story of Jim Martin, the Youngest Anzac

On 28th June 1915, young James Martin sailed from Melbourne on the troopship Berrima – bound, ultimately, for Gallipoli. He was just fourteen years old. This is Jim’s extraordinary story, the story of how a young and enthusiastic schoolboy became Australia’s youngest Anzac. Ages 12 and over.

Colour Of War, The Anzacs Colour Of War, The Anzacs DVD (M)Russell Crowe has narrated a groundbreaking television series about Anzacs, which explores the bond between Australian and New Zealand soldiers during war.The documentary series reveals footage of Anzac Day ceremonies never seen before, including images of soldiers marching on Anzac Day in Adelaide in 1936. It explores the role of Australians and New Zealanders in wars ranging from World War I to Vietnam.

The series was created as a Film Australia National Interest Program, which involved years of painstaking work by film researchers.

A Rose for the Anzac Boys

A Rose for the Anzac Boys

The ‘war to end all wars’, as seen through the eyes of three young women. It is 1915. War is being fought on a horrific scale in the trenches of France, but it might as well be a world away from 16-year-old New Zealander Midge Macpherson, at school in England learning to be a young lady. But the war is coming closer: Midge’s brothers are in the army, and her twin, Tim, is listed as ‘missing’ in the devastating defeat of the Anzac forces at Gallipoli. Desperate to do their bit, and avoid the boredom of school and the restrictions of Society, Midge and her friends Ethel and Anne start a canteen in France, caring for the endless flow of wounded soldiers returning from the front. Exhaustively researched but written with the lightest of touches, this is Jackie French at her very best.

Medals: The Researcher's Guide

Medals: The Researcher’s Guide

This system presents great opportunities for historical research, whether your starting point is an ancestor, a regiments, a campaign, or a medal. Useful information relating to individuals presented with awards is contained in sources still available today., such as the First World War medal rolls which are the nearest we have to a full ‘roll-call’ for the Great War.

Unlike other works that focus on medals identification, this guide shows you how to fully exploit the associated records, and to extend your research into sources such as the censuses and War Diaries.